Trials and Tribulations (1)

March 7, 2010

This was a bad one. I had been trying for over a year to get a contract to carry starch from Corby to Aberdeen – its an ingredient of paper. I knew the client well and got on with him well. Eventually I persuaded him to do a trial with us.

The starch was in “big bags” weighing a tonne each, so handling was easy and a VDA wagon would do the job on rail. I cannot remember which terminal we used to load the starch down south, but I arranged for it to be unloaded in Aberdeen by our own terminal and collected by a truck on contract to the final customer up there. We could achieve a 24 hour transit, but the client said we had two days. But the load was important and so at all costs it mustn’t take more than two days. I was to call him if there was any problem.

It is an important rule for me always to be present at both the loading and the unloading of a trial load. But Aberdeen was a long way, and this was only a load of starch. What could possibly go wrong?

The day of the trial arrived and I watched the big bags being fork lifted across to the VDA. all very smooth and off went the wagon. I rang the terminal in Aberdeen and warned them of the important trial coming their way. I even contacted the local loads inspector to ask him to take a look when it arrived. I kept a close eye on the transit using TOPS – our highly advanced computerised tracking system (this was 1984 – 15 years before sat nav!).

On the day that arrival was scheduled I saw on TOPS that the wagon was in Aberdeen and its status had changed from “loaded” to “empty”. Great! Just to be sure I rang the terminal and the foreman there confirmed having seen the wagon unloaded with no damage. Brilliant!

I am not sure if I tried to ring the client or if I was expecting him to call me, but basically we did not make contact.

Two weeks passed by, and I was plucking up courage to call him and ask for another load. Then I got a phone call. From Great Yarmouth. “Mate, we’ve got a VDA full of starch here, and we think it might be yours.” My blood ran cold? What? How? Surely it can’t be . . . .

It turns out that the nice people in Aberdeen had wrongly entered “empty” for my wagon. Since then it had been wandering around the network, full of starch, and waiting for another load. The man I rang and asked about the trial had seen a different wagon unloaded – of calcium carbonate, not starch.

I had to ring the client who promptly hit the roof. End of another bright prospect.

Message to anyone involved in rail freight: always watch your trial being loaded AND unloaded. Don’t trust anyone else!


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